"Sally" is going on sabbatical to write a book.

Please browse the Bookshelf ~ and look for STEM book reviews over at Archimedes Notebook.

Friday, September 9, 2016

Dorothea's Eyes

Dorothea's Eyes
by Barb Rosenstock; illus. by Gerard DuBois
40 pages; ages 8-12
Calkins Creek (Boyd's Mills), 2016

theme: imagination, nonfiction, history

Dorothea opens her grey-green eyes.
   They are special eyes.
       They see what others miss...

So begins a biography of one of my favorite photographers, Dorothea Lange. Before she ever owned a camera she knew she wanted to be a photographer - even though girls weren't supposed to be photographers. Even though it was hard for her to walk. She skips school to wander around the city, peering into crowded tenements, seeing with her eyes and her heart how people live - "happy and sad mixed together".

What I like about this book: It is about Dorothea! I like how Barb Rosenstock shows Dorothea growing into a photographer. And how her childhood - and her heart - drew her to take photographs of poor people, immigrants, migrant farmers... the invisible people in our society. I like that Dorothea's story can inspire young people to follow their dreams. Most of all, I like that "Dorothea's eyes help us see with our hearts."

Beyond the book: Check out the book trailer at Barb Rosenstock's website. You can also download an Educator's Guide.

Tour this gallery of Dorothea's photographs.

Take a camera on a field trip. Look at the everyday people in your town like Dorothea would - try to see with your heart. What photos do you come home with? 

Next week is National Arts in Education week. Every day next week I'll have art activities or a book review for you. Drop by and join us.
Today is PPBF (perfect picture book Friday), an event in which bloggers share great picture books at Susanna Leonard Hill's site. She keeps an ever-growing list of Perfect Picture Books. On Monday  we're joining the roundup over at the Nonfiction Monday blog where you'll find even more book reviews Review copy provided by the publisher.

7 comments:

  1. What a great true story for kids. I love that she photographed the invisible people. She was born to see the world through her camera lens. I want to read this book!

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    1. Lange is one of my favorite photographers. I've been haunted by her photo of the migrant mom and children for years.

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  2. I, too, want to read this book. I'm fascinated that a camera in the hands of a number of people in the same location will produce vastly different photographs. Everyone has their unique way of seeing the world. This book looks like a gem.

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    1. Definitely true - everyone sees with different eyes.

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  3. LOve her work and find her a wonderful choice for a PB biography!

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    1. And Barbara does such a good job telling her story.

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